Citizen Science: Empowering a Robust National Effort

By Darlene Cavalier May 20th, 2016 at 12:37 pm | Comment

acs citizen science congress
Citizen Science: Empowering a Robust National Effort
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM EDT

with Honorary Co-Hosts
Sen. Steve Daines (R-MT) and Sen. Chris Coons (D-DE)

June 7, 2016, Noon – 1:30 p.m., Russell Senate Office Building, SR-385

Anyone can learn how to use the scientific method in ways that contribute to investigations of how nature works and applying that understanding to develop new technologies. As professional scientists explore the universe, they find instances and places where more hands, eyes, and voices are needed to collect, analyze, and report data: Examples include documenting the biology and chemistry around rivers and lakes, monitoring the weather in sparsely populated regions, or logging the daily course of a disease or exercise regimen. Citizen scientists are increasingly answering the call, be it as enthusiastic hobbyists, STEM students augmenting their learning, or empowered friends and family of medical patients. This panel will discuss how various citizens are enhancing the nation’s scientific enterprise as well as ensuring that the government maximizes its benefits while avoiding any negative impact on the progress of science.

Moderator
Jamie L. Vernon, Sigma Xi and American Scientist

Panel
Darlene Cavalier, Arizona State University, SciStarter
Sophia Liu, United States Geological Survey
David Rabkin, Museum of Science, Boston
Andrew “Andy” Torelli, Bowling Green State University

RSVP to http://bit.ly/acsscicon-citsciRSVP
www.acs.org/science_congress
science_congress@acs.org

Better Living through Citizen Science

By Eva Lewandowski May 20th, 2016 at 1:27 am | Comment

Life-changing citizen science.
People just like you are advancing medical research. Wondering where to start?
Our editors have selected six projects to get you started. Find more than 1,600 citizen science projects and events in the SciStarter Global Project Finder.
Cheers!
The SciStarter Team

Tell Your Citizen Science Story With #MyCitSci

By Catherine Hoffman May 11th, 2016 at 12:53 pm | Comment

#MyCitSci

During Citizen Science Day, we asked our community of citizen scientists to tell their stories and experiences in words and pictures. Here, we’ve summarized many of the amazing stories we’ve heard. There is still time to tell yours. You can post them to our Facebook page or tag us on Twitter with #MyCitSci. We can’t wait to hear your story!

Citizen science is
…exploring new places

Read the rest of this entry »

Look Up Into to the Starry Night for Science

By Guest May 4th, 2016 at 12:58 am | Comment

Composite image of the Earth at night (NASA)

Composite image of the Earth at night (NASA)

Help researchers monitor and understand light pollution with a simple smartphone app

Guest post by Christopher Kyba

How many stars can you see when you look up at the night sky? The answer depends a bit on your vision and a lot on where you live. The bright sky over cities reduces the contrast between the stars and the spaces between them, making them difficult or impossible to see. It’s similar to how the noise from traffic makes it hard to hear singing birds.

This phenomenon is known as light pollution and is of concern for both ecological and human health reasons. For example, the croaking of frogs and toads is a nighttime breeding ritual and artificial right disrupts this activity, reducing populations. Similarly, birds that migrate or hunt at night can have their navigation severely affected by artificial light. Read the rest of this entry »

Methods Matter: Citizen Science Techniques For Exploring Our World

By Arvind Suresh (Editor) April 28th, 2016 at 3:00 pm | Comment

Citizen Science Techniques

Each of the thousands of citizen science projects are unique, yet many rely on similar techniques and methods.

Below, we highlight five that use some of the most popular methods including: the use of low cost, portable sensors; bioblitzes; bird banding; standardized surveys; and photography.

Find more than 1,600 projects and events in the SciStarter Global Project Finder.
Cheers,
The SciStarter Team

Read the rest of this entry »